Course Creation

  • My First Faceless Video Was A Failure But I Learned A Lot

    Let’s face it (pun kind of intended), as introverts, the idea of showing up on camera for our businesses can trigger a cascade of self-doubt. We may feel like impostors, uncomfortable in the spotlight. The mere thought of recording ourselves evokes an internal chorus of “what ifs” and “I can’ts“. If you’re a fellow introverted solopreneur, you might be feeling the exact same way – a mix of excitement and “what am I even doing?” kinda thing.

    I know this feeling all too well. But recently, I finally took the plunge into creating my first faceless video recording (thanks to my mentor who always pushes me to show up even if I don’t want to). To say I was a ball of nerves is an understatement. Here’s a breakdown of the emotional rollercoaster I experienced while recording my first faceless video along with valuable lessons I learned.

    Feelings encountered before recording my first faceless video

    Let’s set the scene: There I was, all geared up (or so I thought) to make my first video. The truth? I was a bundle of nerves. Thoughts like “Who’s even going to listen to me?” and “Do I sound like I know what I’m talking about?” were my uninvited guests. And yes, feeling a bit embarrassed wasn’t fun either. Stepping into the spotlight, even without showing my face, felt like a huge deal, and thinking about it drained my energy faster than I could recharge.

    But here’s the thing – those feelings are totally normal. When you’re about to try something new and scary, you will get tachycardic. And that’s okay (at least in this situation)! What the heck does tachycardic/tachycardia even mean?! In the medical world, tachycardia means a faster heart rate than normal (normal range is 60-100 beats per minute for most adults). Anyway.

    It’s okay to feel overwhelmed and nervous especially when you are recording your first faceless video.
    Action Tip: Whenever you start feeling this, stop and take a breath. Acknowledge your feelings and yourself. Try to make sense of what and why it is happening. Tell yourself and your brain that everything is going to be okay. WE are okay.

    How I felt while recording my first faceless video

    Moment of truth. I took a deep breath, fumbled with settings, and finally hit record. The first moments were undeniably awkward, to say the least. My voice sounded weird to me, and I kept wondering, “Is this really me talking?”. We’ve all heard our voices at some point in time and we’ve all seen the memes that go with it.

    Stutters, mispronounced words, and the inevitable sigh of frustration were all there. Knowing I have an accent did not help either. But, something shifted as I went on.

    Gradually, I began to focus on delivering my message, not on how I looked or sounded. A sense of enjoyment replaced the anxiety while recording my first faceless video. I realized this process allowed me to clarify my ideas and improve my communication skills.

    How I think I sound like versus how I actually sound like

    How I felt after recording my first faceless video

    After hitting stop and replaying my creation, I was not surprised by the sound of my own voice. What particularly caught my attention was how I delivered it. Someone, sign this girl up for communications 101 or something was my first thought. Shame, Kimmy. Shame.

    Here’s what I discovered:

    • Relief: It wasn’t as bad as I had imagined. My first thought, “Huh, I can do this”.
    • Potential: I could see areas for refinement when recording any faceless video – my pacing, tone, and word choice. Instead of feeling discouraged, I felt an exciting sense of direction. This wasn’t about being perfect; it was about taking the leap and making progress. You will never know unless you try.
    • Improvement as Motivation: Suddenly, those imperfections became opportunities to grow. 
    • Shifting Perspective: True confidence, I realized, wasn’t about being flawless. It was about showing up with what you have and a commitment to improve – an ongoing lesson every solopreneur needs to learn.

    So, If you’re sitting there, doubting if you should make a video or share your ideas because you’re an introvert, I’m here to tell you – go for it. You might feel all the feels like I did, but that’s part of your journey. And it’s a beautiful one.

    So, If you’re sitting there, doubting if you should make your first faceless video or share your ideas because you’re an introvert, I’m here to tell you – go for it. You might feel all the feels like I did, but that’s part of your journey. And it’s a beautiful one. Many successful course creators and online business owners began with those same feelings of hesitation and self-doubt.

    Key takeaways when deciding to record your first faceless video

    Here’s what I want you to take away from my experience:

    • Just start small, there is no rush: Don’t compare your starting point to someone else’s highlight reel. Begin at your own pace, even with short, unedited behind-the-scenes faceless video clips. No need to plan an epic movie. A short clip is always a great beginning.
    • Focus on progress: Celebrate the small wins – a clearer script, a smoother delivery, a new editing technique learned. True confidence grows gradually. Every video is a step forward. Learn and tweak as you go. Pat yourself on the back and celebrate every little win along the way. You’re doing great!
    • Self-discovery: Faceless videos can be a powerful tool for gaining insight into your communication style, strengths, and areas for development.
    • Authenticity is key: Don’t try to be someone you’re not. Let your passion and knowledge shine through, even with imperfections. People connect with realness.
    • Perfection Is a Myth: Honestly, your authenticity is way more appealing and is what sells the most. People buy you.
    • Feedback Is Gold: It might sting at first, but it’s priceless for your growth.

    Here are some practical first steps if you’ve been itching to create your own faceless video content as a solopreneur:

    • Start with audio: Record a practice session without the pressure of the camera.
    • Use screen recordings: Share your expertise by demonstrating a process on your computer.
    • Turn blog posts into videos: Expand your reach by giving existing content a new format.
    • Invest in resources: Explore online courses, workshops, and tools that enhance your faceless video creation and communication/public speaking skills.
    • Invest in a mentor. It’s easy to get drowned by subconscious beliefs and inner biases (that’s why it’s called subconscious). Embrace the gift of feedback from a mentor who has been in your shoes in the past.
    • Find your community. You know it can be a lonely journey at times. Joining a like-minded community who you share a mental model with is a great start to lifelong learning. As a solo business owner, you are always learning.

    Remember, creating faceless videos as an introvert is a journey, not a destination. if I can move from nervous to kinda loving it, so can you.  Embrace the learning curve, and let your desire to serve your audience lead the way.

    Remember, creating faceless videos as an introvert is a journey, not a destination. if I can move from nervous to kinda loving it, so can you. Your voice matters, and there’s someone out there waiting to hear just what you have to say. Embrace the learning curve, and let your desire to serve your audience lead the way.